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20110701
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
about whether a blind eye was turnedat scotland yard -- turned at scotland yard. >> for more on the uproar and the culture surrounding the british tabloids, i am joined by a reporter from london. thank you for joining me. coming from this side of the atlantic, is this a uniquely british phenomenon? >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you will get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best-selling newspaper. if you imagine "the national enquirer" was the best-selling newspaper in america, you would understand the situation here. >> they come up with stories that sailed very close to the legal edge. >> they have a culture that says get results whatever the cost. in a situation where circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers, that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line -- the at the line of journalism, as we have seen with these latest "news of the world" allegations. hacking into the phone of a child murder victim. i do not think many people would be shocked, be
>> this is "bbc world news america." scotland yard is under fire. a second top boss goes as the u.k. phone hacking scandal spreads. >> those who take on the most difficult jobs have to stand up and be counted when things go wrong. >> a former reporter and source of a number of the allegations has been found dead. gaddafi must go. that is the message u.s. officials say they delivered in face-to-face talks with representatives of the libyan leader. training for the london olympics. someone from trinidad is overcoming obstacles to make his country prague. -- proud. " welcome to our viewers on pbs and around the globe. each day brings a new twist in the scandal that has engulfed britain. today was no exception. first the news of the second high-profile resignations and scotland yard in 24 hours when john yates announced he was stepping down. then a former "news of the world" reporter that alleged widespread hacking was found dead. the circumstances are not believed to be suspicious. nick robinson reports. >> he resigned just a day after his boss, commissioner paul stephenson. both are
the scandal seems to be far from over. scotland yard say they have identified 4000 possible hacking victims. an inquiry will start into possible wrongdoing by police officers. we have the latest on that part of the case. >> this famous newspaper titles may have been confined to history, but the scrutiny of its methods goes on. britain's most senior policeman has officers investigating whether other officers were bribed by journalists. >> a small group of officers may have engaged in these practices. i will determine to do what we should do, and that is proceed to criminal courts. >> a former employee told the court last year as a witness that he knew nothing about payments from the police or to the police. e-mails have been provided the raise serious questions. >> someone from news international is misleading us. he has to answer a perjury charge, and that is very serious. >> tonight, it is reported that he will be arrested after setting himself to a police station for questioning. scotland yard says its investigation will be robust, whereas in the past, insiders say it has fallen short. on
'brien. scotland yard is under fire. a second top boss goes as the u.k.'s phone hacking scandals spread. >> those of us who take on the most difficult jobs clearly have to stand up and be counted when things go wrong. >> meanwhile, a former news of the world reporter and sources of a number of phone hacking allegations have been found dead. >> outgunned and not outwitted. we find out how the rebels in libya get creative in their fight against the forces of colonel qaddafi. and training for the london olympics. how one hurdler from trinidad is overcoming obstacles to make his country proud. >> welcome to our viewers on pbs and america and also around the globe. each day brings a new twist in the phone hacking scandal, which has engulfed britain. and today was certainly no exception. first came the news of the second high-profile resignation in scotland yard in 24 hours when assistant commissioner john yates announced he was stepping down. then a former world news reporter who said high-spread hacking of the paper under then editor andy clausen was found dead. more on that in a moment. first the bb
in britain today with a second high-level resignation at scotland yard and the death of a whistleblower. good evening, i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, weç get the latest on the scandal including claims of illegal eavesdropping and bribery by journalists working for rupert murdoch's news corp from ned temko of the "london observer." >> ifill: then, we examine president obama's pick to lead a new consumer protection agency. >> woodruff: from indonesia, ray suarez reports on a nation coming to grips with mental health disorders even as its institutions lock up and chain patients. >> this enormous country has almost no psychiatrists,çç leaving the mentally ill with very few options for treatment. >> ifill: kwame holman brings us the latest on the showdown over raising the government's borrowing limit. >> woodruff: and jeffrey brown talks to legendary concert pianist leon fleisher about overcoming a disability that nearly silenced his career. >> if there was a way that i could remain active in music without playing with two hands, well, i had t
her decades of teasing us with her crossword puzzles. the retired couple from scotland are the winners of a massive european lottery. their price is 185 million euros. that is the equivalent of $260 million. it is officially the biggest ever jackpot in your. they are among the 500 richest people in britain. he says they were tickled pink. in the last few minutes, it has been announced that the ceo of dow jones is resigning. the story was first reported in the "wall street journal. " it comes on the same day that rebekah brooks resigned. rupert murdoch also issued an apology to the family of milly dowler the murdered girl whose hacked phone started the crisis. you can read more about that story and the rest of the news on our website a. make sure to check out our facebook page. thank you for watching. have a good weekend. ♪ >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide ra
serious by the moment. when you get the superintendent of scotland yard resigning, the prime minister of great britain going to the well to just basically defend himself and his contacts with him, which were more than any other institution or individual and the country, this is a serious, serious story and reality. >> charles? >> the murdochs were on the defensive and had a lot to defend. i thought their presentation was rather good. i think murdoch -- he runs a company that is unbelievably diverse, and this one paper is a relatively small part of it. i am not surprised, and it is plausible that the committee had a sort of accepted his protestations that he was not aware of all of these shenanigans. what i found really interesting, however, was the way the committee conducted itself. hear, when you have hearings, like the polley north hearings, the inquisitors are on a podium looking down on the defendant there, it was like a british parliament cafeteria meeting. a lot more pointed, less pompous, more effective. >> good review. last word. see you next week. for a transcript of this br
is a story for you. a retired couple from scotland are the winners of the mass of -- massive lottery. their prize, 185 million bureaus, the equivalent of $260 million. it puts them among the 500 richest people in britain. as for reactions, they were tickled pink. i think i would have put it more slightly stronger than that -- slightly more stronger than that, but you can read it along with the rest of the day's news at bbc.com/news. plus, check out our facebook page. for all of us at bbc world news america, thank you for watching and have a great weekend. ♪ >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news america" was presented by kcet, los angeles. announcer: this program was made possible by: >> ♪ i'm a whirlibird... >> chuck e. cheese's, proud supporter of pbs kid
of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the hearings comes after ten arrests and a series of resignatns as fallout from the phone hacking scandal grows. with me john burns, ian katz, deputy he had tortd of the guardian and david karr of the new york city times and sh tyrangiel edito of newsweek. ian katz, what does this day whh rupert murdochcalled the humblest day of his life. what does it change and where do we go from here? >> well, it's not a day we learn an awful lot of significant things. if anything the clearest lesson is wendy dang has a formidable right hook but it was a day of quite striking theatre i think. for in who sits in this country the idea of rupert murdoch who two weeks ago was the most powerful person.country being hauled into parliament to answer questions is prett pretty extraordinary and we had the dialog of him saying it was the humblest day of his lif that w pretty striking. the interesting thing is he and james murdoch came in saying sorry and contrition if you lied but the message was we're sorry but it wasn't else, was someone else's fault and that's the bi
of scotland yard-- sir paul stephenson-- also denied wrongdoing. he said he was embarrassed that he'd hired a former "news of the world" executive, neil wallis, as a public relations consultant. wallis has now been arrested. >> i had no reason to connect wallis with phone hacking. i had no reason to doubt his impropriety. nothing had come to my attention. i had no knowledge of the previous inquiry, and i had no reason to enquire of the previous inquiry, and i had been given assurances by a senior grade chief constable that actually there was nothing new. >> brown: away from the hearings, scotland yard announced today it found no outside involvement in the death of sean hoare, a former "news of the world" reporter who'd been an early whistleblower in the scandal. hoare was found dead monday at his home north of london. more now on today's hearings and the murdoch media empire. we're joined, from london, by john burns of "the new york times," and from new york, by david folkenflik, who covers the media for npr. so, john burns, what struck you most about the murdoch's message today? >> well, i
of the world" also worked simultaneously, if you'll pardon the pun, as a translator for scotland yard. there was also somebody who was working both as the chief correspondent -- or chief reporter of the paper. as a police informant. so the -- there was almost no delineation at times between where news international finished around scland yard began. it was really extraordinary. >> rose: there was a headline,lm reuters saying, is britain more corrupt it thinks? >> i tnk we need to be careful before moving too far in that direction. this is not italy. this is certainly not a banana republic. what we've seen is an entangling of media and politicians and police, a kind of causeuasi new establishment with roles not being clearly enough defined. i think the second point to makeis that let's not forget britain has a very vibrant competitive press. and this story was exposed, not by a police inquire race, not by a parliamentary committee, but by a leading british newspaper "the guardian," helped a little bit by "the new york times," which crucially broke the story that broke the news internat
development, scotland yard released a statement accusing unnamed individuals of trying to sabotage its investigation. part of that probe involves allegations that murdoch journalists paid bribes to police for information. rescuers in russia searched a huge reservoir on the volga river today, after a cruise boat sank on sunday. at least 55 people were killed, with 79 rescued and dozens more missing. it happened about 450 miles east of moscow, in windy, rainy conditions. the boat sank in just eight minutes. today, debris was visible in the water as search boats looked for victims and survivors. families stood by, hoping for news. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to africa where a nation is born, but with many troubles. at midnight friday in juba, the capital of the new south sudan, this sign said it all: "free at last". the turning of the clock to july 9, saturday, meant independence, and the creation of the world's newest nation. >> i am sending good luck to all the southern sudanese. >> woodruff: but the jubilation in the streets of
scotland yard's links to the paper stop police probing the phone- hacking scandal more deeply. full disclosure is embarrassing too for the prime minister. a list of engagements released by downing street today show just how frequently he paid court to news corp. executives and they to him. the prime minister won't be saying sorry for that, but rupert murdoch will be apologizing again this weekend for what he called serious wrongdoing at the "news of the world." he's personally signed a letter, which will run as an advert in seven national newspapers so his later in the day, a second top murdoch executive resigned. since 2007, les hinton has been c.e.o. at dow jones and company, publisher of the "wall street journal." but for 12 years, he chaired the company that oversaw the british tabloids now involved in the scandal. he said in a statement today he was ignorant of what apparently happened, but felt it proper to resign. for more on that part of the story, i'm joined now by rem reider of "american journalism review." thanks for being with us. >> my pleasure. >> so tell us a little b
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)